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FULL STATE CAPTURE REPORT:

The #StateCaptureReport has been released. Download or Read it here: https://t.co/2G5KF4uSG9 https://t.co/CVGftprWJ7

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General corruption queries

 

Help with a non-criminal case of corruption: the Public Protector

The Public Protector is an independent institution established under section 182 of the Constitution. It receives reports from any person who has a complaint of corruption that involves government departments, agencies or officials who violate their ethical codes or codes of conduct, as long as it is not a criminal case. Criminal cases are received by the SAPS, see below.

Reports can be made in person at a Public Protector office in any province. For more advice visit this web page http://www.pprotect.org

You can report corrupt activity to the Public Protector in various ways:

  • Phone 0800 11 20 40, toll free
  • Fax to 012 362 3473
  • Complete the online form
  • Download a complaints form, fill it in and post it to

Public Protector, Private Bag X677, PRETORIA 0001

  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can also send the form you downloaded to this address.
 

Help with a criminal case of corruption: report it to the South African Police Service (SAPS)

 

Cases of corruption that involve criminal offences can be reported at any police station. Report a non-criminal case to the Public Protector, see above.

The SAPS has two specialist units that may investigate corruption cases – the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI, The Hawks) and the Commercial Branch. After a case is opened at a police station, it may be referred to one of these specialist units for further investigation.

The local police station where the case is reported must communicate the progress of the case to the person who reported the case.

You can also report any crime anonymously to Crime Stop, a toll-free hotline run by the SAPS. The number is 08600 10111.

 

Government employee

Help with corruption involving any government employee

The Public Service Commission is an independent institution established under Chapter 9 of the Constitution that oversees the public service. One of the functions is to receive complaints from individuals regarding maladministration, dishonesty, improper behaviour or financial misconduct by government employees. The commission hosts the National Anti-Corruption Hotline for the Public Service, which receives and compiles reports on corruption, and it refers the reports to investigators.

Contact the National Anti-Corruption Hotline for the Public Service on 0800 701701, toll free.

 

Government departments, agencies or officials

Help with government departments, agencies or officials

Help with a problem involving the Department of Environmental Affairs
Call 0800 116 110 toll free to make an anonymous report of dishonesty in the Department of Environmental Affairs.

Help with a problem involving the Department of Home Affairs
Call 0800 204 476 toll free to make a report. You can also send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Help with a problem involving the Department of Human Settlements
Call 0800 204 401 to make a complaint of fraud in the housing department.

Help with a problem involving social grants
You can report any fraud relating to social grants by phoning 0800 601 011 (toll free)

Help with a problem involving the Government Employees Pension Fund
Call the special anti-corruption hotline on 0800 43 43 73 to report a problem.

Help with a problem involving the South African Revenue Service
Call the hotline on 0800 002 870 (toll free) to report fraud and corruption in SARS.

Help with any problem of service delivery: Call the presidential hotline
Call the hotline on 17737 (1 PRES) when attempts to get help from a government department, province, municipality or state agency have failed. You can also send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Help with a problem involving a municipality

You can approach your ward councillor, ward committee or the mayor’s office. Here is a link to a useful manual that can help you effectively deal with your municipality
Download guide

Help with a problem with the Department of Health or a hospital or clinic

  • Call the national office on (012) 395 8000
  • Fax to (012) 395 9019

If you have a problem with a hospital or clinic you should first contact them. If that is unsuccessful you can phone the provincial complaint lines:

  • In the Eastern Cape you can call 0800 032 364 toll free
  • In the Free State you can call 0800 535 554 toll free
  • In Gauteng you can call 0800 203 886 toll free
  • In KwaZulu-Natal you can call 033 395 2009 toll free
  • In Limpopo you can call 0800 919 191 toll free
  • In Mpumalanga you can call 0800 204 098 toll free
  • In the Northern Cape you can call 018 387 5778 toll free
  • In the North West you can call 018 391 4000/1/2 toll free
  • In the Western Cape you can call 021 483 5624 toll free

School

Help with a problem at a school

The National Department of Education has a telephone hotline 0800 202 933 (toll free). Also, click here to find a useful handbook on school governance in South Africa.

Download handbook

Employer

Help with a problem between you and your employer; or a problem with your union or with a CCMA official

You can approach the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu).

  • Phone 011 339 4911
  • Fax to 011 339 5080 / 339 6940
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • PO Box 1019, Johannesburg 2000
  • Street address: Cosatu House, 110 Jorissen Street (cnr Simmonds Street), Braamfontein, Johannesburg.

You can also approach the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) which is an official body for dispute resolution, established in terms of the Labour Relations Act.

  • Call centre 086 116 1616
  • Phone 011 377 6650 / 6600
  • Fax to 011 834 7351
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Private Bag X94, Marshalltown 2107
  • Street address of head office: 28 Harrison Street, Johannesburg 2001
  • To report fraud in the CCMA call the Fraud Hotline on 0860 666 348 or contact the call-back number on 072 595 9135, or send a fax to 086 726 1681.
  • You can also email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Prison

Help with a problem in a prison: The Independent Inspecting Judge for Correctional Services

The Inspecting Judge monitors the treatment of prisoners and the conditions in prisons.

  • Phone 021 412 1012/3/4

Land claim

Help with a problem involving a land claim: Commission on Restitution of Land Rights

The commission is a division of the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform.

  • Private Bag X833, Pretoria 0001
  • Phone the national office on 012 312 9244 / 9146
  • Fax to 012 321 0428
  • Contact Person: Chief Land Claims Commissioner Nomfundo Gobodo by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Magistrate, judge, prosecutor

Help with a problem involving a magistrate: the Magistrate’s Commission
The Magistrate’s Commission is an independent institution established by the Magistrates Act of 1993, which can investigate complaints of corruption involving magistrates. It is based in Pretoria. Contact the chairperson of the Magistrate’s Commission at PO Box 9096, Pretoria, 0001, or on 012 325 3951, or by email atThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Help with a problem involving a judge: the Judicial Service Commission

The Judicial Service Commission is an institution established under section 178 of the Constitution. If it receives a complaint of corruption involving a judge, it can create a Judicial Conduct Committee to investigate. It is based in Bloemfontein. Contact details for the Judicial Service Commission:

  • Phone 011 838 2010 / 2019
  • Fax to 086 649 0944
  • Private Bag X1, Constitutional Hill, Braamfontein 2017
  • Street Address: 1 Hospital Street, The Constitutional Court, Constitutional Hill, Braamfontein, Johannesburg

Help with a problem involving a prosecutor:  the National Prosecuting Authority Hotline

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) is an institution established under section 179 of the Constitution. It employs and manages all prosecutors. It has a telephone hotline where any person can report corrupt activities and unethical behaviour by members of the NPA staff. The NPA hotline is open 24 hours a day, is administered by an independent organisation, and will accept anonymous calls.

  • Contact the NPA Hotline on 0800 21 25 80
  • Or post your complaint to the National Prosecuting Authority, Private Bag X752, Pretoria 0001.

The police

If you are unhappy with the service from SAPS you can call the SAPS Service Line 0860 13 0860, toll free.

Help with a problem involving a police official: the Independent Police Investigations Directorate
The Independent Police Investigations Directorate (IPID) is an independent institution established under the Constitution. It investigates any person’s complaint against both the SAPS and the metro police services. The IPID investigates the following kinds of cases:

  • The involvement of any SAPS members in criminal activities such as corruption, assault, theft, robbery, rape or any other criminal offences.
  • The involvement of any metro police member in criminal activities such as corruption, assault, theft, robbery, rape or any other criminal offences.
  • Police conduct or behaviour that is prohibited in terms of the SAPS Standing Orders or Police Regulations, such as neglect of duties or failure to comply with the Police Code of Conduct.

A complaint about police corruption may be lodged in person at an IPID office in any province, or by telephone, letter or email. Visit this IPID web page for more information. The complaint must be written down on the form which may be downloaded as a PDF – print it, fill it out and submit it.
Download the form

Help with a problem involving a traffic officer: phone the National Traffic Call Centre
You can call 0861 400 800 (not toll free) to report fraud and corruption in government traffic activities, as well as to report bad drivers, unsafe vehicles and reckless and negligent driver behaviour. You can also send a fax to 086 602 5928.

KwaZulu-Natal

3rd Floor
The Marine Building
22 Dorothy Street Nyembe Street(Gardiner Street)
Durban
Tel. 031 310 1300
Fax. 031 305 8214
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gauteng

20th Floor
Marble Towers Building
No. 208-212 Jeppe Street
Johannesburg
Tel. 011 220 1500
Fax. 011 333 2705
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limpopo

2nd Floor Femnic Building
66A Market Street
Polokwane
Tel. 015 291 9800
Fax. 015 295 3409
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mpumalanga

Nedbank Centre, 1st Floor
48 Brown Street
Nelspruit
Tel. 013 754 1000
Fax. 013 752 2602
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eastern Cape

Mezzanine Floor Permanent Building
4244 Oxford Street cnr Terminus Streets
East London
5200
Tel. 043 7066500
Fax. 043 7066526
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Free State

15 cnr Andrew & Westburger Streets
Ground Floor
Standard Bank Building
Bloemfontein
Tel. 051 406 6800
Fax. 051 430 8852
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Northern Cape

39 George Street
Kimberley
Tel. 053 807 5100
Fax. 053 832 5615
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

North West

No.1 Station Road
Molopo Shopping Centre, 1st Floor
Mafikeng 2745
Tel. 018 397 2500
Fax. 018 381 1495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Western Cape

Fintrust Building, 1st Floor
Corner Petrusa & Mazzur Street
Bellville 7530
Tel. 021 941 4800
Fax. 021 949 3196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Pension fund

Help with a problem between you and your pension fund: The Pension Funds Adjudicator

The Pension Funds Adjudicator receives complaints regarding private sector pension funds, provident funds and retirement annuities. It investigates and determines complaints of abuse of power, maladministration, disputes of fact or law and employer dereliction of duty in respect of pension funds.

  • Phone 012 346 1738 or 012 748 4000 for inquiries
  • Fax to 086 693 7472
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Give an anonymous tip-off at 0800 111 667 (toll free) or fax to 0800 00 77 88 (toll free) or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

If you are a government pensioner, contact the Government Employees Pension Fund who deal with complaints regarding government employee pension funds.

  • Phone 0800 117 669 toll free
  • Fax to (012) 326 2507
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Send post to GEPF, Private Bag X63, Pretoria 0001
  • Complaint letter may be addressed to Office of the CEO, GEPF, Private Bag X63, Pretoria 0001
  • Visit this page http://www.gepf.gov.za/index.php/contact_us to get contact details for regional offices.

If you are a government pensioner, contact the Government Employees Pension Fund who deal with complaints regarding government employee pension funds.

  • Phone 0800 117 669 toll free
  • Fax to (012) 326 2507
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Send post to GEPF, Private Bag X63, Pretoria 0001
  • Complaint letter may be addressed to Office of the CEO, GEPF, Private Bag X63, Pretoria 0001
  • Visit this page http://www.gepf.gov.za/index.php/contact_us to get contact details for regional offices.

Banking, insurance and retail

Help with a problem between you and your medical aid: the Council for Medical Schemes

The Council for Medical Schemes receives complaints about medical schemes’ services and products.

  • Phone the customer care centre on 0861 123 267
  • Register a complaint on (086) 673 2466
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Visit the website at http://www.medicalschemes.com

A problem between you and your bank: The Ombudsman for Banking Services 

This ombudsman receives complaints about banking services and products. Visit this page http://www.obssa.co.za/index.php/complaint-form for advice on how to register a complaint and to download a form after first trying the recommended steps.

  • Phone (011) 712 1800
  • Share call 086 080 0900
  • Fax to (011) 483 3212
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Visit the website at obssa.co.za

A problem between you and a short-term insurance company: The Ombudsman for Short Term Insurance

This ombudsman receives and considers complaints about short-term insurance companies. Short term insurance includes car insurance, household insurance, cell phone insurance, travel insurance and disability insurance. For long term insurance see below.

Contact the ombudsman only after you have unsuccessfully communicated with the insurance company.

  • Phone (011) 726 8900
  • Sharecall 0860 726 890
  • Fax to (011) 726 5501
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Visit the website at http://osti.co.za
  • Visit the offices at Sunnyside Office Park, 5th Floor, Building D, 32 Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown
  • Send a letter to PO Box 32334 Braamfontein, 2017

A problem between you and a long-term insurance company: The Ombudsman for Long Term Insurance

This ombudsman receives and considers complaints about long-term insurance companies. Long term insurance includes life insurance. For short term insurance, see above.

Contact the ombudsman only after you have unsuccessfully communicated with the insurance company

  • Phone (021) 657 5000 or 0860 103 236
  • Sharecall 0860 662 837
  • Fax to (021) 674 0951
  • Send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Visit the offices at Third Floor, Sunclare Building, 21 Dreyer Street, Claremont, Cape Town, 7700
  • Send a letter to Private Bag X45, Claremont, Cape Town, 7735

Help with a problem involving a shop or company where you have bought something or where you have an account: The National Consumer Commission

The commission receives consumers’ (customers) complaints about shops, businesses or companies.

  • Phone 0860 00 3600 toll free, or 012 761 3000 /3400
  • Fax to 086 758 4990
  • Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Download a complaints form to fill in and fax or post.
  • Website nccsa.org.za
 

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 27 September, 2016

Text: Raees Noorbhai
Photograph: Makgotso Nkosi

Disappointment requires expectations. So on Monday morning last week, when Higher Education Minister (and personification of incompetence) Blade Nzimande's announcement came, the students gathered in Solomon Mahlangu House weren't disappointed - we were enraged. Moments later, the call was made. "We are shutting down". Fists rose, and voices rose with them. Concourse was once again transformed into the nucleus of resistance at Wits University. Within the hour, students were streaming out and marching to blockade entrances, aiming to reclaim the space in the name of free education. The wheels of history, already in motion at other institutions around the country, began to turn at Wits University.

Before the first wave of protests, the retrograde current of the State was already tugging in the opposite direction - something exemplified by Nzimande's announcement. The minister established that there will be no increase for students whose household income is below R600 000 a year, and that the increment will be capped at 8% for all other students. His lack of resolve was on public display once again, as he passed the buck to universities on the issue of a 2017 increment, while refusing to properly engage the broader issues of decolonisation and free education. The announcement was also a brazen attempt at political obfuscation. By claiming that the decision to raise fees is ultimately made by the universities, the minister is obscuring the reality that universities are public institutions that are heavily dependent on state subsidies. Expenses necessarily increase, due to inflation and other expenses like journal fees which are paid in dollars. Therefore, in the absence of a subsidy increase, universities effectively have two choices - cut costs through austerity measures and compromise the quality of education, or raise fees. When this is accounted for, it is evident that the decision to raise fees, for all intents and purposes, rests with the State.

That decision, however, is not made in a vacuum. It is made within a climate of financial exclusion and exploitation that shuts the doors of learning to the poor and working class - a climate that is empowered by private capital and encouraged by the State. Yes, a fee increment serves to exacerbate this state of affairs, but abolishing the increment will do little to address the core of the problem. Fees, along with the myriad expenses associated with being a student, remain too high for too many. Our universities are still plagued by racism, hetero-patriarchy, exploitative labour practises, and the project to commoditise. The minister's announcement was grounded in the expectation that students will ignore the bleeding once the state has put a Band-aid on our bullet wound, as we did last year. Students are now resolute that this is a mistake we are not willing to repeat. Education is one of many mutually-reinforcing structures of an unjust status quo. A status quo in which your destiny is determined by the hand dealt to you by Capital. This is the status quo which we are no longer willing to tolerate. This is the retrograde current of the neoliberal state. This is why we continue to struggle, to march, to shut down.

Free Education & The Retrograde Currents of State, Society, Police and Party
 

The status quo, as expected, has not reacted favourably to the attempts to dismantle it. Pre-emptively, the retrograde current of the police was mobilised, with the ruling classes co-opting one sector of the working class, transformed into the armed custodians of oppression, to brutalise another. On Monday morning, before Nzimande's announcement, scores of police vans littered Wits main campus, along with hordes of private security personnel. This was only the latest display of the trend of militarisation that has gripped our campuses since last year's protests. In an essay for theSocialist Register (republished by Jacobin) on the Coup against Salvador Allende's socialist government in Chile, Ralph Miliband notes that those of us on the left are accustomed to seeing class struggle as being waged solely by the subordinate classes against the ruling classes - yet the reality is that the ruling powers, every day, wage a multi-pronged assault on the working class. It is, as he points out, the bread and butter of capitalist society. However, he goes on to say that when "those men of power of privilege sense a real threat from below" to the world they cherish, their assault takes on an altogether different character - it becomes a class war. We are witnessing the manifestation of this at universities across the country. Those allied with the status quo, sensing this threat to the injustice they defend, have made it clear that violence is not a tactic they are willing to disown. The university, in its emails and press statements, preaches peace, while on the ground, its armed men don riot gear and train their weapons on students, preparing for a war against those armed chiefly with a demand for a better future. This, I'm afraid, is often a self-fulfilling prophecy...

On Tuesday, rocks were hurled at the private security blockading the Great Hall entrance, after students were pushed down the stairs in front of that building. Private security, instead of diffusing the situation, chose to escalate it by hurling those rocks back from behind their riot shields. Students were injured, and relatively-minor damage was done to property. Almost immediately, reactionary societal elements employed their calculus of value, with variables tied to Capital weighted disproportionately. Those broken windows were awarded more sympathy than the scores of student bodies, black bodies, that have been brutalised and beaten by the police and private security. This is telling. A zeitgeist of Capital is seldom as evident as it is in the impulse to mourn the loss of property before reckoning with the loss of dignity. The same impulse was present on Wednesday, when the police opened fire with rubber bullets and used teargas on peacefully-protesting students in the streets of Braamfontein. The people who mourned the broken windows were largely silent. Those who condemn violence by students, but are silent when that violence is directed towards students, do not believe in non-violence, but in the monopoly of violence held by the State and Capital.

Nonetheless, the stance of the student leadership at Wits has consistently been in favour of non-violence, and the student movement has indeed been overwhelmingly peaceful. However, as Arundhati Roy points out in her analysis of the Maoist rebellion in India, non-violent, so-called Gandhian tactics only work when the cameras are rolling. Given the preferential treatment afforded to “elite” institutions like Wits and UCT, peaceful (albeit disruptive) tactics are a viable option. However, when our comrades at UKZN or UWC or Fort Hare protest peacefully, they are ignored. We are by no means the first to notice this disparity. Dr Martin Luther King Jr., who is so often quoted out of context as a pacifying platitude, noted that a riot is "the language of the unheard". We should not condone the destruction of universities, but if the establishment really wants to avoid it, then it is imperative that they listen.

Free Education & The Retrograde Currents of State, Society, Police and Party
 

That said, if we are making the demand that they listen, it is necessary that we, as students, speak more clearly, and with one voice. On the Wits front, factionalism threatened to derail the movement early on, with elements of the Wits EFF Students Command opposing the shutdown if its sole purpose was to stop the increment. Earlier this year, on this platform, I had backed the Wits EFF in the SRC elections, aiming to avoid the possible conflict of interest posed by an ANC-aligned PYA dominating the SRC. I argued that we cannot allow ourselves to be fooled into believing that it is possible to address this crisis without holding the ANC accountable in a concrete way. Indeed, the ruling party as an entity represents a retrograde current of its own, with ANC Secretary General Gwede Mantashe arrogantly declaring that, were he higher education minister, he would shut down all universities and residences for six months, to “teach protesting students a lesson”. Apprehension surrounding any ANC-aligned faction within our elected structures, therefore, was not without basis.

However, the Wits student body differed strongly on whether the PYA should be voted out altogether, and the Alliance won all 15 seats in the election (with some help from the conditions of the electoral process). This mandate from the student body is to be taken seriously. Those of us who fielded or backed candidates in the election acknowledged the legitimacy of the SRC by doing so. This legitimacy does not evaporate because our favoured parties did not triumph. It should be afforded to the SRC, but not uncritically - and not unconditionally. The reality is that our movement is stronger if our directly-elected representatives are a part of it, so long as they too are held accountable. It is now necessary for both sides to display the political maturity that history demands of us. By the end of last week, it was clear that the parties were beginning to hear this demand.

On Thursday, the SRC leaders of last year's Fees Must Fall occupied centre stage in Solomon House, pledging support for their successors and affording a measure of leadership continuity - yet simultaneously acknowledging the legitimacy of leadership beyond the SRC, notably within the Wits EFF. Crucially, they brought forward a refreshing resolve to confront the reactionary elements within their own party, with former SRC president and ANC member Mcebo Dlamini boldly declaring that if the ruling party fails to deliver on free education, the people must vote them out. Wits students resolved to begin bridging the partisan divide, forging a united student front. The central demand also crystallised that afternoon: free education, not within the ambiguous timeframe of "our lifetimes", but now. On Friday, students marched to the headquarters of Cosatu calling for the support of the unions, before former Cosatu Secretary General Zwelinzima Vavi reiterated that call in Solomon House later that day. A new front is being forged, with organised labour and the working class being called on to down tools in solidarity with students. The foundation is now being laid for a broader movement, a stronger movement that can shake the core of an unjust status quo.

Of course, there are still those cynics hiding behind the mask of “realism” who nonetheless dismiss the demand for free education. This is the retrograde current of Society, which, when it is not hurriedly pointing at shattered windows with indignation, believes that it is duty-bound to remind us of "economic realities", or, more accurately, of the infallibility of status quo economic gospel. They call on a caricature of Dr King to encourage passivity, while forgetting that the same Dr King expressed disappointment in their ilk, when he wrote in his Letter from a Birmingham Jail of those “moderates” who "paternalistically believe that they can set a timeline for another man's freedom" and who are "more devoted to 'order' than they are to justice". Indeed, their continuous defence of “law and order”, in the current climate, is not dissimilar to a defence of unjust laws and an oppressive order. Moreover, their deployment of the “realism” tactic speaks of a pitiful conception of reality. A reality that is perceived to be unchanging, and unchangeable. "Things have always been this way". Slavoj Zizek, reflecting on the first step to freedom, highlights that for many, it is easier to imagine an asteroid destroying all life on earth than it is to imagine a modest change in the economic order. The student uprising in this country represents the refusal to bow to that fatalism. We are the reinvigoration of the political imagination, driven by the belief that we are more than capable of breaking down the unjust edifices of our world, and building a better one in its stead.

History, it seems, is more the vessel upon the waters than it is the tide. It only moves if we move it. The missteps of our past cannot compel us to abandon ship, for we are more than capable of defying the retrograde currents of the status quo. The time has come for us all to reach across the partisan divide, grab the oars, and - with the strength of a unified political will - heave and row until we feel the shores of free education beneath our feet. This time, we can convert the ambitions of the political imagination into a more just reality. This time, we must.

 

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Amongst the causes, cases and campaigns Stand UP! works with and fights for are the interconnected rights of humans, animals and earth. Some highlights:

  • We are actively committed to our own Justice For Children campaign, #16DaysMustFall for #HumanRights365 and other projects
  • Locally we are committed to the rights of our homeless, traders, shackdwellers and fellow residents oppressed by the system and its agents
  • National  campaigns we support and are involved with include Justice for Marikana, #FeesMustFall and the International Tribunal for Natural Justice [ITNJ]
  • Global campaigns include an anti-GMO, anti-fracking and anti-surveillance world - and an end to corporate, political and military corruption, oppression and terror
  • Our legal division Bambanani previously represented shackdwellers movement Abahlali base Mjondolo in Umlazi, Durban and other causes-cases and campaign areas
  • Our media division Face2Face Media produces a social justice newspaper Amandla News - centered around real, alternative, independent news that people can use
  • Amandla Academy hosts inspiring, interactive empowerment workshops in areas like human rights, sustainable living, citizen journalism, and common law-natural justice